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The fact that people on the Left have to constantly Make Up false Racism
to blame on the Right - is PROOF that the Right is indeed "not" Racist.

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sweetwater5s9
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« Reply #168 on: 04 30, 16, 09:28:21:AM » Reply

In New York, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay and James Madison pushed for the ratification of the Constitution in a series of essays known as The Federalist Papers. The essays, published in New York newspapers, provided a now-classic argument for a central federal government, with separate executive, legislative and judicial branches that checked and balanced one another.

When the first Congress convened in New York City in September 1789, the calls for amendments protecting individual rights were virtually unanimous. Congress quickly adopted 12 such amendments; by December 1791, enough states had ratified 10 amendments to make them part of the Constitution. Collectively, they are known as the Bill of Rights.

The Convention had been authorized merely to draft amendments to the Articles of Confederation but, as Madison later wrote, the delegates, "with a manly confidence in their country," simply threw the Articles aside and went ahead with the building of a wholly new form of government.

They recognized that the paramount need was to reconcile two different powers -- the power of local control, which was already being exercised by the 13 semi-independent states, and the power of a central government. They adopted the principle that the functions and powers of the national government, being new, general and inclusive, had to be carefully defined and stated, while all other functions and powers were to be understood as belonging to the states. But realizing that the central government had to have real power, the delegates also generally accepted the fact that the government should be authorized -- among other things -- to coin money, to regulate commerce, to declare war and to make peace.

http://www.let.rug.nl/usa/outlines/history-1994/the-formation-of-a-national-government/constitutional-convention.php
1965hawks
Sr. Member

Posts: 25377


« Reply #169 on: 04 30, 16, 04:11:09:PM » Reply

sweetwater5s9: In New York, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay and James Madison pushed for the ratification of the Constitution in a series of essays known as The Federalist Papers. The essays, published in New York newspapers, provided a now-classic argument for a central federal government, with separate executive, legislative and judicial branches that checked and balanced one another.

When the first Congress convened in blah blah blah blah....





sweetwater5s9,

A red herring, sometimes referred to as ignoring the question, sidetracks an issue by bringing up a totally unrelated issue.

What you're babbling about is probably true, but it has absolutely no relevance to the issue at hand. The issue here is whether or no the Constitution is a living document. Nothing you are babbling about here is even remotely addresses that question. All you're doing here is continually posting irrelevant distractions away from the main issue (red herrings).

duke_john
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« Reply #170 on: 04 30, 16, 04:26:12:PM » Reply

Give it up, hawkshit.  No one buys your crap.  Peddle your papers elsewhere.
sweetwater5s9
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Posts: 99144


« Reply #171 on: 04 30, 16, 04:49:09:PM » Reply

When the first Congress convened in New York City in September 1789, the calls for amendments protecting individual rights were virtually unanimous. Congress quickly adopted 12 such amendments; by December 1791, enough states had ratified 10 amendments to make them part of the Constitution. Collectively, they are known as the Bill of Rights.
sweetwater5s9
Contributor
Sr. Member

Posts: 99144


« Reply #172 on: 04 30, 16, 04:58:24:PM » Reply

The issue here is whether or no the Constitution is a living document.


A living document or dynamic document is a document that is continually edited and updated. A simple example of a living document is an article in Wikipedia, an online encyclopedia that permits anyone to freely edit its articles, in contrast to "dead" or "static" documents, such as an article in a single edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica.

A living document may or may not have a framework for updates, changes, or adjustments. This type of document without proper context can change away from its original purpose through multiple uncontrolled edits.

The U.S. Constitution can only be changed by the procedures set out in Article Five of the Constitution.

Article Five of the United States Constitution describes the process whereby the Constitution, the nation's frame of government, may be altered. Altering the Constitution consists of proposing an amendment or amendments and subsequent ratification.
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